Supportive School Environment

Plan to Improve Reading ACT Scores for the Gap Group

To increase the percent of gap students including African American, economically disadvantaged and those with disabilities who have met the reading college readiness benchmark on the ACT to 50% by 2019.

According to the school report card for 2017, the average reading ACT score for all students who tested was 20.5.  The average African American score was 18.6 and the average Hispanic or Latino score was 20.3. Students who were classified as economically disadvantaged averaged 18.4 and those with disabilities averaged 15.1.  While 52.1% of the students met the college readiness benchmark for reading, only 42.1% of the African Americans met this benchmark and 44.4% of the Hispanic/Latino population met this benchmark. Of the economically disadvantaged 39.3% met the benchmark and 7.8% of the students with disabilities met the college benchmark for reading.

Of the African American population 20% was considered chronically absent.  Of the economically disadvantaged population 32.3% was considered chronically absent.  Of the students with disabilities 34.7% were considered chronically absent. Of the 98 faculty members only 2 are African American and 2 are Hispanic or Latino.  Only 125 students had a parent conference and parents only volunteered a total of 11,201 hours for a school with over 1800 students. The school does not permit students to take home school issued devices for student learning.  

Strategy 1:

Reading Progress Monitoring – Teachers in Professional Learning Communities will collaborate by analyzing common assessments of the gap group students

  • Teachers will collaborate after each common assessment containing both constructive responses and multiple choice questions. As they analyze student data, they will make decisions based on best instructional practices and provide intervention strategies for struggling gap students. Teachers will meet to develop strategies that work for the gap students, analyze student work, review data, plan for intervention, and support the team’s purpose with meaningful dialogue and evidence.
  • Grade-level English teachers will have a common planning period each day that will allow them to plan, intervene, share and collaborate on strategies. The teachers will establish a true learning community or professional who can identify and move gap students to proficiency.  The focus of their planning will be moving gap students toward college readiness.
  • Teachers will work with in their PLC to follow District Curriculum Maps and Assessment Calendars to ensure that gap students receive all the content necessary to be college ready in math.
  • Teachers will analyze the data from proficiency assessments and determine what the data reveals and who is affected. They identify gap students by naming them and claiming them for understanding of skill/concept. They will then determine the root causes and set goals for each student with action steps outlined in the 30/60/90 Day plans.

Strategy 2:

Differentiated Instruction – Teachers will look at ways to differentiate instruction so as to better serve the gap group students.

  • The learning styles of the gap students will be assessed so that teachers may differentiate instruction to meet their needs based upon their individual style.
  • Teachers will use ACT type questions as bellringer activities to ensure that gap students receive all the content necessary to be college ready in reading.
  • Teachers will teach specific strategies to successfully answer questions to prepare gap students for the ACT and EOC assessments.  Strategies to include: highlighting main ideas, summarizing, underlining what the question asks students to find, etc. Teachers will model test taking strategies, teach study and practice strategies, encourage students to use the resources provided by ACT.
  • Teachers will use the TCA prep program with the gap students to weekly practice ACT questions. They will also encourage gap students to use ACT practice exams. This program will analyze gap student responses and outline the skills that are in need of improvement.  

Strategy 3:

Focused Interventions – Teachers will analyze the data from common assessments to identify concepts that need to be targeted for specific gap students.  They will also analyze gap students’ work to identify the gap students who have not mastered the skill/concepts.

  • English teachers will provide training and support throughout the year with a focus on intervention strategies and programs that specifically target gap students
  • Gap students will be assigned to an intervention teacher for additional instruction until the concepts have been mastered and the student has been assessed on the skills.
  • Teachers will analyze the data from proficiency assessments and determine what the data reveals and who is affected. They identify gap students by naming them and claiming them for understanding of skill/concept. They will then determine the root causes and set goals for each student with action steps outlined in the 30/60/90 Day plans.
  • Gap students who are identified to receive targeted interventions will receive additional service such as: ESS, Study Island, TCA prep, day-time extended instruction by Reading Resource Teacher and YSC referrals.

Research:

Strategy 1:

Strategy 2:

Strategy 3:

  • Focused Interventions – Teachers will analyze the data from common assessments to identify concepts that need to be targeted for specific gap students.  They will also analyze gap students’ work to identify the gap students who have not mastered the skill/concepts.
    • Lang, L., Torgesen, J., Vogel, W., Chanter, C., Lefsky, E., & Petscher, Y. (2009). Exploring the Relative Effectiveness of Reading Interventions for High School Students. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness,2(2), 149-175. doi:10.1080/19345740802641535
  • Teachers will collaborate after each common assessment containing both constructive responses and multiple choice questions. As they analyze gap student data, they will make decisions based on best instructional practices and provide intervention strategies for struggling gap students. Teachers will meet to develop strategies that work, analyze gap student work, review data, plan for intervention, and support the team’s purpose with meaningful dialogue and evidence.
  • English teachers will have a common planning period each day that will allow them to plan, intervene, share and collaborate on strategies that will be useful for the gap students.   The teachers will establish a true learning community or professional who can identify and move gap students to proficiency
  • Teachers will work with in their PLC to follow District Curriculum Maps and Assessment Calendars with a focus on the gap students.  
  • English teachers will provide training and support throughout the year with a focus on intervention strategies and programs that will move the gap students toward college readiness in Reading.  
  • Individual Professional Development will be provided for teachers. Teachers will be trained to implement strategies that integrate with the ACT Quality Core Standards in Reading and are designed to improve the gap groups scores.   Appropriate assessments will show documentation of instructional goals.